More Diabetes Medications Recalled Over Consumer Cancer Concerns

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coronavirus diabetes
coronavirus diabetes

Another series of diabetes medications have been recalled by Viona Pharmaceuticals over cancer concerns due to the ingredient N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA).

NDMA is classified as a probable human carcinogen – a substance that could cause cancer – which was discovered during testing in one lot of Viona’s Metformin Hydrochloride Extended-Release tablets with a 750 mg dosage. The tablets were found to have NDMA out of specification allowed by the Food and Drug Administration.

Out of an “abundance of caution,” Viona voluntarily recalled 23 lots of the Metformin Hydrochloride Extended-Release tablets in the 750 mg dosages distributed nationwide.

Metformin is used to manage blood glucose in adults who have Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

The affected medication was manufactured by Cadila Healthcare Limited in Ahmedabad, India, for Viona and was packaged in 100-count HDPE bottles with an NDC number of 72578-036-01.

The recalled Metformin can be identified as white to off-white capsule-shaped, uncoated tablets, debossed with “Z,” “C” on one side, and “20” on the other side.

A full list of recalled Metformin tablets from Viona can be viewed here.

Patients who have the recalled Metformin tablets in their possession are advised to continue taking the medication. They should contact their physician for an alternative treatment plan as it could be more dangerous to stop taking the medication without first talking to a healthcare provider, the FDA said.

Consumer questions about the recall can be directed to Viona Pharmaceuticals at 1-888-304-5011, Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. EST.

Viona and Cadila have both said they have not received any reports of adverse events related to the recall.

Consumers who experience any problems related to taking the recalled Metformin tablets should contact their healthcare provider.

Viona also issued a recall for 33 lots of Metformin tablets in late December 2021 due to NDMA levels that were not in line with FDA acceptable daily limits.




Photo: stevepb

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