Major Cabinet Ministers Refuse To Revoke Australian Passports For Terror Suspects

By @snksounak on
A Kurdish protester sits behind a sign reading " STOP ISIS terror" in front of the United Nations headquarters in Vienna October 9, 2014. A group of Kurdish people living in Austria are on hunger strike since Monday in solidarity for Syrian Kurd
A Kurdish protester sits behind a sign reading " STOP ISIS terror" in front of the United Nations headquarters in Vienna October 9, 2014. A group of Kurdish people living in Austria are on hunger strike since Monday in solidarity for Syrian Kurds who are fighting to defend the Syrian-Turkey border town of Kobane from Islamic State militants. Reuters/Leonhard Foeger

Australia has been considering the idea of revoking citizenship for its people involved in terrorism activities overseas. However, the process may not be easy.

Several Australian citizens travelled to Middle Eastern countries like Iraq and Syria. While the federal government wants to restrict their return to the homeland, several lawyers are trying to negotiate with the government. They request entry for their clients and, in return, claim that the homecoming Australians will act as witnesses against terrorist groups like Islamic State.

The Guardian reported that the cabinet members responsible for making government policy had not approved the policy to revoke citizenship. Six major cabinet ministers rejected the idea of stripping citizenship from second generation Australians.

The ministers, who refused to support the policy, are Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull, Education Minister Christopher Pyne, Agriculture Minister Barnaby Joyce, Attorney General George Brandis, Defence Minister Kevin Andrews and Foreign Affairs Minister Julie Bishop. The ministers expressed concern about the substance of the policy.

Two Sydney teenagers travelled to Syria after having been groomed by an ISIS recruiter. The teenage boys had their ticket paid for and were guided to have an elaborate travel map to dodge detection. The boys were promised military training and a weekly salary.

However, the teenagers escaped Syria after getting terrified by the war zone. They were disillusioned by the brutal reality as the real life experience was blatantly different from what they had imagined it to be. "They thought they were going to be freedom fighters. It was nothing like that," the Sydney Morning Herald quoted a youth worker who helped teenagers escape the war zone.

There are around 100 Australians who are reported to be working with ISIS forces in the Middle East. If Australian government decides to revoke their passports, then it will be almost impossible for them to get back to their homeland.

Terrorist Khaled Sharrouf is reported to be among those who want to come back to Australia. According to Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott, anyone willing to return is going to face the "full severity" of the law. Abbott is also expected to heighten punitive measures for those who travel to be involved in terrorist activities overseas.

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