Apple wins as Galaxy S6 fails; Google reveals the Galaxy S6 Edge’s flaws

By @preciousvsilva on
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A man looks at his Apple iPad in front an Apple logo outside an Apple store in downtown Shanghai March 16, 2012. Reuters/Aly Song

Samsung's recent sales figures suggest that the company is in jeopardy. The Samsung Galaxy S6 and the Galaxy S6 Edge continue to fail in driving sales that the company is relying more on its mid-range Galaxy J to stay on top of the smartphone charts. Furthermore, new data reveals that consumers should be more worried about Galaxy S6 Edge's security.
 
Counterpoint Research analysed Samsung's recent numbers and found that the company is losing market share. According to the report: "Smartphone gained volume momentum rising to 84 million units though growing slower than the global growth hence losing some market share.  However, due to introduction of competitive affordable J series of smartphones while S6 series undergoing price correction across many markets helped Samsung see a healthy uptick sequentially."
 
As for the premium segment, Samsung can count on the Galaxy Note series to be the saviour especially these coming holidays. The Note 5's positive demand can also offset the low interest over Galaxy S6 flagship SKUs. The opposite can be said for Apple as it posted its strongest ever fourth quarter for both sales and revenue. Shipments for the quarter are at 48 million with 22.4 per cent year-over-year increase.
 
Winning over Apple is just the tip Samsung's concerns as new data from Google highlights 11 security flaws on the Galaxy S6 Edge, as discovered by Project Zero. Many of the issues have been fixed upon Google's notification to Samsung, but the rest still needs to be addressed.
 
"There is definitely a tension between Google and the handset manufacturers because Google wants to protect its Android brand, and when it comes to security, Android has been quite tarnished," BBC quoted Dr Steven Murdoch, a security researcher at University College London. Some of the security problems stem from added features from manufacturers. Samsung released a statement that the remaining bugs should be fixed later this month.
 
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