Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi's Real Name Revealed; ISIS Leader Top US Target With $10 Million Bounty

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Smoke raises behind an Islamic State flag after Iraqi security forces and Shiite fighters took control of Saadiya in Diyala province from Islamist State militants, November 24, 2014.
Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott’s decision to send troops to Iraq has received mixed reactions from experts. While some believe that it will help the security of the country, some think that it is unlikely to make Iraqi army stronger. Smoke raises behind an Islamic State flag after Iraqi security forces and Shiite fighters took control of Saadiya in Diyala province from Islamist State militants, November 24, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer REUTERS/Stringer

ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi had once worked in office administration before he was captured by U.S. soldiers in Iraq in 2004. Declassified documents revealed that he was held for 10 months in a military prison under his real name, Ibrahim Awad Ibrahim Al Badr.

Al-Baghdadi’s status in the prison was listed as “civilian detainee” which meant the U.S. military had not thought of him as insurgent during that time. According to the documents obtained by the Business Insider, the ISIS leader was registered as married with an uncle listed as his next of kin.

Previous reports have indicated that it was believed he was detained during a raid by the U.S. military with the goal of arresting his friend Nessayif Numan Nessayif in Fallujah. Al-Baghdadi is reportedly 43 years old with a wife and young son. Before his radicalisation, he was remembered as a young and unassuming man who had an interest in religious studies.

Since ISIS’ rise to power, the militants have shocked the world with their brutal activities including the horrific executions of their prisoners. ISIS is believed to have more than 30,000 fighters. The Daily Mail reports that Al-Baghdadi’s head has a $10 million reward after he was listed as a “Specially Designated Global Terrorist” by the U.S. State Department.

Meanwhile, U.S. President Barack Obama has urged countries to address the root causes of violent extremism in a speech before foreign officials in a counter-terrorism summit. The president said the cycles of conflict must be broken and governments should address the economic and political grievances terrorists might exploit.

Mr Obama said the link between oppression and violent extremism cannot be denied. He believes the denial of human rights can create an environment terrorists might take advantage of.

The U.S. has been keeping a list of ISIS fighters being targeted in Iraq and Syria. A senior official said the U.S.-led coalition is hoping that the ISIS operatives will be killed in future airstrikes. Al-Baghdadi is identified as the number one target in the U.S. kill list.

An official has told CNN that it has been several months since the last report of Al-Baghdadi’s whereabouts. He is believed to be in hiding since he was aware of the U.S. tracking him down.

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