‘Death in a can’: Energy drink addiction leads to heart attack

By @ritwikroy1985 on
Energy Drinks
Energy drinks are displayed at a Walmart store in Secaucus, New Jersey, November 11, 2015. Reuters/Lucas Jackson

Martin Bowling, an energy drink addict from UK, suffered a massive heart attack after he downed two litres of caffeine-pumped energy drink in The Bull pub in Romford. 28-year-old Bowling got addicted to caffeine beverages unaware of the energy drink side effects. His habit reached such a proportion that he was spending $156 every week to quench his thirst. He has been consuming the beverages for seven years, starting at the age of 21.

According to Express, Bowling, an insurance worker from Essex, got hooked to the drinks as he had to keep up his energy for catering to his gruelling work demands. He collapsed on the pub floor and was quickly rushed to Queen’s hospital. Doctors who treated him discovered alarmingly high levels of caffeine in his blood stream and confirmed he has had a heart attack. Bowling is extremely lucky to be alive. He has alleged that the caffeine energy drinks he consumed never came with any health warning.

“There were no warning signs. I don't even know if it hurt. I just remember hitting the floor and waking up in hospital. Now I see those drinks as death in a can,” Bowling said, reports Mirror.co.uk. He is extremely thankful to the stranger who took quick actions and saved his life. Bowling suffered the attack at around 7pm on June 1 while watching a boxing match at the pub.

Senior dietician of British Heart Foundation, Victoria Taylor advised that some people are more sensitive to energy drink side effects though moderate levels of consumption generally don’t affect the heart. Caffeine may have a strong impact on the health of children and young people. They are more vulnerable due to their sensitivity towards caffeine side effects, according to Taylor.

“Even when doctors told me high caffeine levels were the cause, I still wanted a can. It was ridiculous,” Bowling said, reports News.com.au.

The World Health Organisation (WHO), also issued a warning for energy drinks consumption as they are capable of causing public health concerns especially when they are mixed with alcohol.

Energy drinks and caffeine beverages are marketed for boosting mental performance, energy levels and aiding weight loss. They contain high amounts of caffeine that appear to be the main cause for associated health risks. The high concentrations of caffeine in energy drinks, if taken in large quantities, can lead to heart palpitations, blood pressure, increased heart rate and at times even heart attack.

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