Rare lunar eclipse and blood moon photos from different parts of the world; Australia misses supermoon [PHOTOS]

By @vitthernandez on
  • Supermoon
    A combination of three pictures shows the moon turning orange during a total "supermoon" lunar eclipse in Brussels September 28, 2015. Sky-watchers around the world are in for a treat Sunday night and Monday when the shadow of Earth casts a reddish glow on the moon, the result of rare combination of an eclipse with the closest full moon of the year. Reuters/Yves Herman
  • Cape Town Moon
    The moon is partially covered by the Earth's shadow during a total lunar eclipse in this combination picture taken in Cape Town, September 28, 2015. Sky-watchers around the world were treated when the shadow of Earth cast a reddish glow on the moon, the result of rare combination of an eclipse with the closest full moon of the year. The total "supermoon" lunar eclipse, also known as a "blood moon" is one that appears bigger and brighter than usual as it reaches the point in its orbit that is closest to Earth. Reuters/Mike Hutchings
  • Wales Moon
    A lunar eclipse coincides with a so-called "supermoon" as seen from St Florence, Tenby, Wales, September 28, 2015. A supermoon occurs when the Moon is in the closest part of its orbit to Earth, meaning it appears larger in the sky. This phenomenon was last observed in 1982 and won't come again until 2033. Reuters/Rebecca Naden
  • Paris Moon
    The Moon, appearing next to a statue on the Alexander III bridge, in a dim red colour, is covered by the Earth's shadow during a total lunar eclipse over Paris, France September 28, 2015. Sky-watchers around the world were treated when the shadow of Earth cast a reddish glow on the moon, the result of rare combination of an eclipse with the closest full moon of the year. The total "supermoon" lunar eclipse, also known as a "blood moon" is one that appears bigger and brighter than usual as it reaches the point in its orbit that is closest to Earth. Reuters/Philippe Wojazer
  • Tijuana Moon
    A supermoon, the last of this year's supermoons, is pictured in the sky in Tijuana, Mexico, September 27, 2015. Sky-watchers around the world are in for a treat Sunday night and Monday when the shadow of Earth casts a reddish glow on the moon, the result of rare combination of an eclipse with the closest full moon of the year. The total "supermoon" lunar eclipse, also known as a "blood moon" is one that appears bigger and brighter than usual as it reaches the point in its orbit that is closest to Earth. Reuters/Jorge Duenes
  • Swiss Moon
    The moon, appearing in a dim red colour, is covered by the Earth's shadow during a total lunar eclipse over the peak of mount Rigi, Switzerland, September 28, 2015. Sky-watchers around the world were treated when the shadow of Earth cast a reddish glow on the moon, the result of rare combination of an eclipse with the closest full moon of the year. The total "supermoon" lunar eclipse, also known as a "blood moon" is one that appears bigger and brighter than usual as it reaches the point in its orbit that is closest to Earth. Reuters/Arnd Wiegmann
  • Paraguay Moon
    A supermoon rises in the sky in Asuncion city, Paraguay, September 27, 2015. Sky-watchers around the world were treated when the shadow of Earth cast a reddish glow on the moon, the result of rare combination of an eclipse with the closest full moon of the year. The total "supermoon" lunar eclipse, also known as a "blood moon" is one that appears bigger and brighter than usual as it reaches the point in its orbit that is closest to Earth. REUTERS/Jorge Adorno Reuters/Jorge Adorno
  • Russian Moon
    Children look at the moon as they gather in the settlement of Poschupovo in Ryazan region, Russia, September 27, 2015. Sky-watchers around the world are in for a treat Sunday night and Monday when the shadow of Earth casts a reddish glow on the moon, the result of rare combination of an eclipse with the closest full moon of the year. The total "supermoon" lunar eclipse, also known as a "blood moon" is one that appears bigger and brighter than usual as it reaches the point in its orbit that is closest to Earth. Reuters/Maxim Shemetov
  • Warsaw Moon
    A man takes picture of the screen displaying the moon, appearing in a dim red colour, which is covered by the Earth's shadow during a total lunar eclipse in Warsaw, Poland September 28, 2015. Sky-watchers around the world were treated when the shadow of Earth cast a reddish glow on the moon, the result of rare combination of an eclipse with the closest full moon of the year. The total "supermoon" lunar eclipse, also known as a "blood moon" is one that appears bigger and brighter than usual as it reaches the point in its orbit that is closest to Earth. Reuters/Kacper Pempel
  • Venezuela Moon
    Couples embrace at Mirador Valle Arriba as they watch the supermoon in Caracas, Venezuela September 27, 2015. The astronomical event occurs when the moon is closest to the Earth in its orbit, making it appear much larger and brighter than usual. Reuters/Marco Bello
  • London Moon
    A supermoon is seen during a lunar eclipse behind pods of the London Eye wheel in London, September 28, 2015. Sky-watchers around the world are in for a treat Sunday night and Monday when the shadow of Earth casts a reddish glow on the moon, the result of rare combination of an eclipse with the closest full moon of the year. The total "supermoon" lunar eclipse, also known as a "blood moon" is one that appears bigger and brighter than usual as it reaches the point in its orbit that is closest to Earth. Reuters/Toby Melville
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Moon enthusiasts did not let the rare event on Sunday pass them by without bringing out their smartphones, cameras and telescopes to view and take pictures of the lunar eclipse and blood moon, or supermoon.

Space.com reports that it received a number of impressive images of the moon taken from different parts of the world where it was seen clearly. The images came from lunar observers in the US, Canada, Mexico, UK and other parts of the world. 

Those who had good images of the reddish gold colour were from areas with clear skies. Some people, or billions, watched the blood moon from those in the western hemisphere to parts of Europe, Asia and Africa.

However, Australia, New Zealand and parts of Asia missed it, although people from that part of the world had a chance to watch NASA’s live stream of the event, which last took place 30 years ago and will next occur in another 30 years, reports ABC.

For one hour and 11 minutes, the Earth’s shadow blanketed the full moon while the planet passed between the sun and the moon. During the eclipse, the moon’s brilliant white glow slowly transformed into a dim red caused by the Earth’s atmosphere scattering sunlight unto the moon’s shadow.

Despite forecasts of an apocalypse, there was no asteroid hit on Earth as NASA had stated. The world also did not end, contrary to the expectations of some groups such as the El Shaddai Ministries in Washington and the John Hagee Ministries in San Antonio, Texas, notes the Sydney Morning Herald.

The Aussie daily also reports that Sunday’s event dashed the blood moon prophecy of Rabbi Mendel Kessin, an Orthodox Jewish clergyman from New York. Because Australia did not witness the blood moon, Perry Vlahos of the Melbourne Astronomical Society, comments, “If there is  deity up there, therefore, sending worrying messages via the night sky, He is evidently not that concerned with keeping the southern hemisphere in the loop. Perhaps only half of the world is about to end.”

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