‘Empire’ Taraji P. Henson On The Difference Between Her And Cookie

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Actress Taraji P. Henson presents the award for Outstanding Drama Series to "How to Get Away with Murder" at the 46th NAACP Image Awards
IN PHOTO: Actress Taraji P. Henson presents the award for Outstanding Drama Series to "How to Get Away with Murder" at the 46th NAACP Image Awards in Pasadena, California February 6, 2015. Reuters/Danny Moloshok

Gearing for “Empire” Season 2, Taraji P. Henson revealed that she is not bold as her Fox TV show role as Cookie Lyon. Best known for her outstanding performance in the 2008 film “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” Henson started her TV career as Detective Jocelyn Carter in the CBS drama “Person of Interest” before landing the role as the fiery Cookie Lyon of “Empire.”

Now coming to the UK, the phenomenal musical drama series made a huge impact from its premiere all the way through the last episode of Season 1. Created by Lee Daniels and Danny Strong, “Empire” stars two of Hollywood’s talented stars, Terence Howard (“Hustle and Flow”) as Lucious Lyon and Henson, who plays the estranged couple in the hip-hop soap.

During her latest interview in London, the 44-year-old actress revealed what it’s like to play the iconic role, why people should start watching the show and when is she going to start singing.

"I'm not bold enough to be Cookie,” Henson told Digital Spy. “I don't like confrontation. I walk away – I'm like, 'Okay, you got it, go argue with yourself because I don't feel like it!’ She's the moral compass of the show. If you look for the truth, you look to Cookie, because she's going to be right there telling you the truth.”

Now becoming as everybody’s hero, the “Karate Kid” star described Cookie as someone who “champions for the good people” because she says and does things that most people are afraid to do and say.

When asked what it is about the show that makes it exceptional, Henson admitted that “Empire” has Cookie, fashion, drama and music that most TV shows don’t have. The series offers something that people can only see in film or on cable channels, thanks to Strong and Daniels who shifted the paradigm of network television.

She added that the show is not about its all black cast but the trick it to give the viewers a “good TV” with a good cast. Although the show doesn’t have any definite premiere date for its second season, Henson hinted that she might be singing in the upcoming season.

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