Charlie Hebdo cartoonist Joann Sfar spreads the message of ‘Paris About Life’ to condemn the attacks

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The front page of the new issue of satirical French weekly Charlie Hebdo entitled "C'est Reparti" ("Here we go again"), is displayed at a kiosk in Nice February 25, 2015. More than 2.5 million copies of this second issue since the January 7, 2015 attack by gunmen on the magazine's offices which killed twelve people, are slated to be published and on the news stands this Wednesday. Reuters/Eric Gaillard

The world woke up to the horrendous news of Paris attacks that were carried out on Friday night and the message “Pray For Paris” spread like a wildfire on several social networking sites to support the French capital. It was then that the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo came up with a surprising message that urged people to stop praying for Paris. The cartoon by artist Joann Sfar shocked everyone with the message in the creative piece that he uploaded on Instagram on Friday.

"Friends from the whole world, thank you for #prayforparis, but we don't need more religion. Our faith goes to music! Kisses! Life! Champagne and Joy! #Parisisaboutlife," Sfar's message stated.

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A photo posted by Joann Sfar (@joannsfar) on Nov 13, 2015 at 5:15pm PST

The post has received over 20,000 likes on the social networking site and has received support from people all around the world. This cartoon by Sfar has paved the way for the hashtag #Parisaboutlife.

The attacks were executed on three key locations of the French capital - Stade de France, Petit Cambodge restaurant and Bataclan theatre. The attacks have claimed the lives of 129 people, while, 352 were injured.

The 44-year-old artist presented the undying spirit of the city of love through his creation which had an atheist approach. According to People.com, Charlie Hebdo had to bear the brunt of terrorism as it came under attack by gunmen in January over a drawing that showed Prophet Muhammad. The attacks were carried on for three days and left 12 people dead and 11 wounded.

After the heinous act of terrorism, the entire world supported the publication and appreciated them for their cartoons. However, the recent Paris attacks have refreshed the horrific memories associated with the Charlie Hebdo incident and Sfar’s post somehow reflects the need to change the approach towards such awful incidents.

Taking a glimpse at Sfar’s background, he was born to Jewish parents. His mother Lilou, a pop singer, is Ashkenazi and this has a significant role in Sfar’s work. The cartoonist has confessed that he has Ashkenazi humour in his “Professeur Bell” series which is loosely based on Joseph Bell. Sfar has also written and directed the drama “Gainsbourg: A Heroic Life” that was based on well-known French songwriter and singer Serge Gainsbourg.

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