Mobile sales on Black Friday to surpass Cyber Monday

Online sales on Black Friday have continued to increase annually
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People shop at Target on Thanksgiving Day in Burbank, California November 22, 2012. The shopping frenzy known as "Black Friday" kicked off at a more civilized hour welcomed by some shoppers this year, with retailers like Target Corp and Toys R U
People shop at Target on Thanksgiving Day in Burbank, California November 22, 2012. The shopping frenzy known as "Black Friday" kicked off at a more civilized hour welcomed by some shoppers this year, with retailers like Target Corp and Toys R Us moving their openings earlier into Thursday night. Picture taken November 22, 2012. Reuters

Black Friday will likely outpace Cyber Monday in mobile traffic and sales. Based on past experince, it looks like the number of deals to be closed during Black Friday will be a whole lot more compared to sales on Cyber Monday.

A year ago, mobile traffic was much higher on Black Friday than on Cyber Monday, said Ad Week. The magazine also noted that online sales on Black Friday have continued to increase year after year. For certain niches, growth has been very dramatic.

Last year, Black Friday sales surpassed those of Cyber Monday by a massive 57 percent, according to Media Horizons.  Also last year, IBM's mobile sales on Black Friday accounted for 27.9 percent of total online sales, which was actually up by 28.2 percent from 2013. For Adobe, some 27 percent of the items it sold to avid shoppers on Black Friday came from its mobile device department.

It would appear the main factor that drove the rapid rise in product sales was making more Black Friday deals accessible online. This way, potential clients can easily access a certain deal without having to fall in line in front of Macy's, Best Buy or other retail stores.

That said, it would seem that marketing mobile devices, or launching promotional ads aimed at today's army of mobile shoppers, will turn out to be a lucrative move for companies looking for more sales and profit.

Consumers have come up with their own reasons why Black Friday is such a big deal for them. In general, Fridays are usually much better for mobile shopping as compared to Mondays. After all, Friday is the beginning of a work-free weekend for many consumers. 

On Mondays, however, tech users are back to their offices and workplaces. They might manage to sneak in a hidden tab somewhere in the browser they’re using in order to close a Cyber Monday deal, but it’s highly unlikely they’ll get enough time to actually browse further for more deals.

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