Kraken, the deadly mythical sea monster, may have been spotted in South Atlantic Ocean near Antarctica [VIDEO]

By @ritwikroy1985 on
Giant Squid
The beak and mouth of the giant two-metre squid which washed up on the shores of Tasmania's Ocean Beach, near Strahan, is seen at the Tasmanian Museum in this July 13, 2007 handout photo. Reuters/Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery/Simon Cuthbert

Experts believe that the gigantic mythical creature that Google Earth spotted living in the South Atlantic Ocean, just off the coast of Antarctica is the Kraken. The Kraken is a legendary seas creature that has been responsible for capsizing ships and killing sailors off the Nordic coast in the 20th century and further back in the past.

Monster hunters who spotted the creature believe it’s a giant squid. The creature was spotted near Deception Island in the South Shetland Islands. Some people are of the opinion that the thing is a sea monster. The creature’s middle section measured 30 metres or 100 feet. The creature was first spotted on April 9. It measures 120 metres including its tentacles.

“This looks like a Kraken. I used Google ruler and it says this is 30 metres (100 feet) from head to end, but this looks like just the mid area of a giant squid, which means it could be 60+ meters long with tentacles. That sounds like a Kraken to me. Maybe the stories about the giant monster of the deep are all true. A lot of stories are based on truths. I think we found the Kraken,” Scott C Waring, who found the image, told The Sun.

The Kraken is believed to have brought down three boats as recently as the 1930s. Others have linked the monster to prehistoric marine lizard the plesiosaurus.

In a video uploaded on July 2015, Russian sailors caught a rare glimpse of a giant squid. The video showed the squid wrestling with a fish the sailors caught. They are forced to defend their catch of the day. They use a long pole to poke the animal away.

According to News.com.au, the group of animals generally referred to as giant squids, comes in a number of varieties. Other members of the species include the two-metre long robust clubhook squid and the four-metre cockatoo squid.