Does Higgs Boson Exist? Latest Evidence From Large Hadron Collider To Provide Answers

By @ibtimesau on

New evidence from the Large Hadron Collider will soon finally resolve questions on whether or not the Higgs boson or "God particle" exists.

Two teams of physicists will be meeting Dec. 13 at the CERN laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland to dislose their latest findings from two main experiments on the Higgs boson.

A theoretical particle is believed to give mass to everything in the universe, the Higgs boson, confirming or disproving the existence of the particle entirely would overturn many assumptions of modern physics.

During the meeting, scientists are expected to present data that could be strong enough o make a confidence guess as to the existence or non-existence of the Higgs boson.

Dr Alan Barr, the Physics Coordinator for the ATLAS UK collaboration, said the meeting was likely to produce an intermediate result rather than conclusive evidence, but added that there "could be some surprises."

"It is anticipated there may be some interest in this because we collected five times more data this year than we anticipated. This is enough to give pointers of what is happening - whether there is a Higgs boson, there is no Higgs boson, or there is something completely different, and even more interesting," Dr Barr said.

The two teams, which both include British experts, will not be comparing their results beforehand to avoid biasing their interpretation of their own data so that even the researchers involved cannot determine the impact of their what their findings in the context of the results from the other group.

Thus, if the data from the two teams match it could provide the strongest hint yet of the existence - or non-existence - of the so-called "God particle."

"It is anticipated there may be some interest in this because we collected five times more data this year than we anticipated. This is enough to give pointers of what is happening - whether there is a Higgs boson, there is no Higgs boson, or there is something completely different, and even more interesting," said Dr. Barr.

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