Experts Want to Use Nuclear Power to Fight Global Warming

By @snksounak on

A sign marks the borders of the site where EDF Energy's Hinkley Point C nuclear power station will be constructed in Bridgwater, southwest England October 24, 2013.

Some of the greatest climate experts in the world claim that solar energy and wind power are not going to be enough to counter the extreme nature of global warming. The scientists are now asking environmentalists to support the progress of nuclear power as a means of cutting fossil fuel pollution.

There were four scientists who have been instrumental in cautioning the public about the perils of climate change. Former NASA scientist James Hansen, Ken Caldeira from the Carnegie Institution, Kerry Emanuel from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Tom Wigley from the University of Adelaide in Australia.

These four scientists sent letters to major politicians and environmental groups on Sunday. A copy of their letter was sent to The Associate Press in advance. The four scientists have urged to have a critical discussion on the role nuclear power plays in confronting climate change.

Even though environmentalists come to an agreement that global warming turns out to be threat to humans and ecosystems, many of them do not agree on nuclear power. They also believe that the new developments in renewable energy are going to be enough to provide power to the world in the coming decades. This claim has, however, been termed as unrealistic in the letter.

The letter says that the advocated energy sources are not able to expand fast enough to provide the amount of reliable, yet inexpensive power which the world requires. The rate of the emission of carbon dioxide is far higher than how fast those renewable energies are developing. It also mentions that we are not in a position to turn our face away off any kind of technology capable enough to scale down greenhouse gases.

Harvard professor Stephen Ansolabehere, who focuses his studies on energy issue, has commented that nuclear power happens to be 'very divisive' in environmental movements. However, he has also said that the letter may inform the public regarding the difficult options climate change represents.

The Natural Resources Defense Council, a major organisation that advocated environmental better being, has cautioned that nuclear power is not a solution to climate problems.