In-App Purchases Happen Before And After Work

By @vitthernandez on
People look at a shop window selling accessories on sale in downtown Madrid December 19, 2013. Retailers in Europe are predicting their best Christmas since the financial crisis, though optimism is laced with caution in the face of rising e-commerce and e
IN PHOTO: People look at a shop window selling accessories on sale in downtown Madrid December 19, 2013. Retailers in Europe are predicting their best Christmas since the financial crisis, though optimism is laced with caution in the face of rising e-commerce and early discounting in a fragile economic recovery. REUTERS/Andrea Comas

It is a known fact that retail therapy gives one a “quick rush” which explains why psychologists encourage it in small doses from time to time. But a new trend is rising in the world of mobile Internet shopping, and it is redefining people's perceived notions of consumers' shopping behaviour.

According to a new study from technology firms AppLovin and TUNE, users are no longer making in-app purchases during their lunch breaks as they did before. "Whether it be in games, retail, travel or other commerce apps, users are much more likely to make purchases before and after work," stated Marketing Land, using data from the study.

The study evaluated millions of transaction and billions of data points made by US mobile users during the first quarter of 2015 to primarily understand the difference between in-app purchase behaviour and e-commerce patterns.

The study found that mobile shopping revenues and usage peak at 7 am and 7 pm daily. It also found that revenues in the morning — before each workday — always surpassed the previous night's revenues. Conversely, usage rates are found to be low before workdays, and inch up hourly, peaking at 8 pm.

The results of the study speak volumes on how mobile commerce and online spending behaviour differ, and why advertisers should change their game plan, according to Marketing Land.

"In-app advertisers should look to increase win rates during peak hours and weekends and consider time-based offers or discounts during the times of day and days of week where most spending occurs," Marketing Land advised. "Take a close look at your own app performance and don’t assume all platforms perform the same." 

Texas-based company Oven Bits noted on its website that it's no longer a question for retailers to build a native mobile app or rely passively on mobile web. With mobile commerce increasing by 47 per cent during the second quarter of 2014 alone, and a third of online retail sales done through mobile devices, businesses should put having a custom mobile app on top of their priority list.

"Both the mobile web and native applications have their strengths and weaknesses—and rightly so. Yet for the retailer committed to creating an amazing experience for their customer, native apps provide the most opportunity with a higher conversion rate, greater average order value and per visit value," the company said on its blog. 

Oven Bits also noted that mobile apps "bridge the gap between physical and digital for creative and meaningful in-store experiences."

IT Craft is also one company based in Ukraine that offers native app development services for businesses, not just in its home country but also abroad. The company has over 30 clients from 16 countries and has been operating for 15 years.

The company applies agile methodologies in its mobile application design and development process. Its business also puts emphasis on the use of iBeacons apps and why restaurants and retailers should have one. iBeacons is a location-based technology that allow businesses to send smartphone notifications pertaining to special offers and discounts to in-store customers.

To contact the writer, email: vittoriohernandez@yahoo.com