Ready-To-Eat Bacon Products Recalled Over Possible 'Foreign Matter Contamination'

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Food, Bacon, Macaroni Cheese
Representation.

A company is recalling its ready-to-eat bacon products because of possible foreign matter contamination. 

The affected bacon topping products from Smithfield Packaged Meats Corp may contain "extraneous materials," particularly metal, noted a recall alert posted on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) website. The problem was reportedly discovered after a customer filed a complaint about finding metal in the ready-to-eat product.

In total, some 185,610 pounds of bacon products are affected by the recall, including Golden Crisp Patrick Cudahy Precooked Bacon Topping, Smithfield Precooked Bacon Topping, Golden Crisp Patrick Cudahy Fully Cooked Bacon Topping Applewood Smoked, Smithfield Fully Cooked Bacon Topping And Member's Mark Fully Cooked Bacon Crumbles.

The products came in 5-lb. packages and had the establishment number "EST. 27384" in the USDA mark of inspection. They were produced between Feb. 21-23 and March 3-5 and shipped to distributors and retail locations "nationwide." The FSIS added that they may have also been used to make other products as well.

"FSIS expects there to be additional products containing the bacon and urges consumers to check back frequently to view updated lists and labels," said the agency.

The SKU and Lot codes of the products included in the recall are available on the FSIS website. The agency also provided photos of the products' labels.

"FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers' refrigerators or found at distributor and retail locations," the agency said. "Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. Additionally, distributors and retailers are urged not to sell these products."

Foreign matter is any type of contaminant that was introduced to the product at some point during production or distribution, for instance, due to an equipment issue or during employee handling. The risk level depends on the amount of foreign matter in the product.

In the case of the current recall, there have been "no confirmed reports" of injuries or adverse incidents after consuming the product.

"Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider," noted the FSIS.


Food, Bacon, Macaroni Cheese

Photo: Pixabay-Social Butterfly

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