Twitter employee who deactivated Trump's account says he is the president's fan

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U.S. President Donald Trump listens during a briefing on hurricane Harvey recovery efforts in Dallas, Texas, U.S, October 25, 2017.
U.S. President Donald Trump listens during a briefing on hurricane Harvey recovery efforts in Dallas, Texas, U.S, October 25, 2017. Reuters/Kevin Lamarque

A man who was first identified as the former Twitter employee behind the 11-minute deactivation of US President Donald Trump’s social media account has said that he had made a mistake. The act, according to him, did not involve a political agenda.

Bahtiyar Duysak has confessed that he actually admires the US leader’s work ethic and business savvy. "I did a mistake, I confess," he told CNN. He added that he was confident he did not do anything illegal or break Twitter’s rules.

The 28-year-old has been identified as the employee behind the deactivation of Trump's Twitter account in an interview with TechCrunch. Twitter was yet to confirm who was behind the brief deactivation, previously saying it was conducting a full internal review.

Just a mistake

Duysak said it was not like he was planning to do it. Instead, he confessed he did not do a good job by not double-checking things.

He described Trump as a “very successful person.” He also admires how the POTUS made it to his current position as the leader of the free world, although he thinks Trump needs to learn a little as a politician.

According to TechCrunch, Duysak was a temporary contract worker in San Francisco for Twitter. He was reportedly assigned to customer support as part of the Trust and Safety division.

The last day at work

“Eventful” was the word Duysak used to describe his last day at work. He recalled someone reporting about the POTUS’ account at the end of his shift.

Duysak responded as he would. However, his actions supposedly led to the suspension of Twitter’s most high-profile user.

He said he never thought Trump’s Twitter account would get deactivated. He even thought it was protected by Twitter's internal policies.

His error, Duysak said, only came to his attention following reports that an employee, in his last day of work, deactivated Trump’s Twitter account. "The specific mentions of this person on his last day, I immediately knew I was the only guy who left on the last day- I felt a little bit nervous," he said.

Twitter initially said Trump's "account was inadvertently deactivated due to human error by a Twitter employee.” Then the company released another statement saying the outage was due to a customer support employee on their last day in the job.

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