Andy Murray loses Wimbledon but earns praises after correcting reporter who overlooked female achievements in tennis

By @chelean on
Tennis - Wimbledon - London, Britain - July 12, 2017  Great Britain’s Andy Murray during a press conference after losing his quarter final match against Sam Querrey of the U.S.
Tennis - Wimbledon - London, Britain - July 12, 2017 Great Britain’s Andy Murray during a press conference after losing his quarter final match against Sam Querrey of the U.S. Reuters/Joe Toth/Pool

Andy Murray lost Wimbledon 2017 but won praises from social media and his mum after he corrected a reporter who appeared to have overlooked the achievements of female tennis players. The 30-year-old world no. 1, who lost to American Sam Querrey in the quarter-final on Wednesday, did not let people forget women play the sport as well.

During the post-match press conference of his match against Querrey, a reporter claimed Querrey was the first US player to reach a major semi-final since 2009. This was not accurate, though, as there are other American players who have already done so.

“Andy, Sam is the first American player to reach the semi-final since 2009…” the reporter began before Murray interrupted him. “Male player,” the sportsman said, repeating himself when the reporter failed to hear him the first time.

The reporter rectified himself, laughing at his own blunder, though Murray appeared to be unamused. As social media speculated, he could just be disappointed by his loss. It could also be that he did not find the exclusion of women in the sport as anything remotely funny.

Murray was right. Querrey may be the first American male player to reach semi-finals, but he is not the first. Serena and Venus Williams, Coco Vandeweghe and Madison Keys have all done that before him.

Murray’s casual correction has not only earned praises from tennis fans all over the world, but his mother as well. Scottish tennis coach Judy Murray was certainly proud of his son’s behaviour. First Minister of Scotland Nicola Sturgeon also called him a star.

This was not the first time Murray had to correct a reporter for forgetting about female achievements in tennis. At the Rio Olympics last year, BBC sportscaster John Inverdale commented that Murray was the first person to win two tennis golds. Murray had to remind him that the Williams sisters had surpassed him in that regard.

Read more:
Andy Murray vs Sam Querrey live stream: How to watch Wimbledon 2017 online
Roger Federer vs Milos Raonic live stream: How to watch Wimbledon 2017 online

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